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Apples: Health Benefits and Nutritional facts

 

Apples

Apples are a popular fruit rich in antioxidants, vitamins, dietary fiber, and other minerals. Their nutritional diversity may help avoid various diseases.

Apples come in various sizes, colors, and tastes. Apples contain nutrients that may help a person’s health in many ways.

They may help prevent cancer, obesity, heart disease, diabetes, and other diseases.

Learn about the nutritional value of apples and how they may enhance one’s health.

Apples Nutrition

The nutrition varies slightly between the different apple varieties, but not all that much. Here’s the nutrition breakdown for one medium apple:

  • 95 calories
  • 0 g protein
  • 0 g fat
  • 25 g carbohydrates
  • 4 g fiber
  • 8 mg vitamin C
  • 98 IU vitamin A
  • 195 mg potassium

Apples are a great source of both water and fiber, which help you feel full. Apples also have the added advantage of making you feel full for a long period. You tend to overeat when you consume foods that you can scarf down in a hurry.

Moreover, apples have a low glycemic index. This implies that they don’t cause an increase in blood sugar levels after consumption. Because your body can reasonably digest the sugar, you may enjoy a blushing Red Delicious or a bright Honeycrisp. Having an apple as a snack might be a wise method to satisfy cravings since apples are delicious and filling at the same time. Just be sure to consume the whole fruit, including the skin. You’ll feel fuller longer if you consume more fiber.

Health Benefits of Apple

Boosts brain health

It’s no surprise that apples may aid in weight reduction since a medium apple packs in less than 100 calories. In the end, it’s the kind of apple that you eat that matters, according to one research study. Apple slices helped people feel fuller and more satisfied than applesauce, apple juice, or no apple slices at all. In the same research, people who ate apple slices before their meal consumed an average of 200 fewer calories than those who did not.

The kind of apple you consume may also have a role in your health. According to animal research published in Food Chemistry, Granny Smith apples had fewer carbohydrates and more non-digestible chemicals, including feel-full fiber than McIntosh, Golden Delicious, and other popular kinds. Some obesity-related health issues may be reduced due to the chemicals’ ability to feed good gut microorganisms. Recent lab research discovered that Bifidobacteria, beneficial microbes in our microbiome, increased when we ate full skin-on apples rich in prebiotics.

Apple may boost heart health.

Apples are high in fiber, vitamin C, antioxidants, and potassium. a medium-sized apple gives the following:

  • An average of 13–20 percent of a person’s daily fiber intake
  • Vitamin C provides 9% to 11% of a person’s daily needs.
  • 4% of the daily potassium requirement.
  • Reduced blood pressure is one of the potential benefits of eating more fiber.

Vitamin C is an antioxidant that may have a role in safeguarding various aspects of heart health, along with other antioxidants. Taking vitamin C may also assist the body fight against infections and sickness.

Reducing high blood pressure and cardiovascular problems may be achieved via potassium’s ability to relax the blood vessels.

Lowers your risk of type 2 diabetes

The stats tell the story. According to a comprehensive assessment of data by Tufts researchers, people who eat one or more apples per day had a 23% reduced chance of developing type 2 diabetes than those who don’t. Those who consume one or more apples a day are 28 percent less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who eat apples.

In addition, Harvard researchers discovered that those who had at least two servings of blueberries, grapes, and apples per week reduced their risk of diabetes by 23% compared to those who consumed just one serving per month. The fruit’s fiber, according to experts, aids with blood sugar stabilization. Flavonoids, a type of antioxidant, also play an important role.

Apple may help fight cancer.

It isn’t easy to find a fruit with a higher cancer-fighting antioxidant activity than the apple (second only to cranberries). Many cancers, including colon, breast, and prostate, may be reduced by eating one apple a day or more. According to an Italian study, eating one or more servings of apples a day reduced the risk of colorectal cancer more than any other fruit. Apples have been shown to be beneficial in avoiding lung and prostate cancer in human trials. Don’t toss the peel, though. That’s where most of the cancer-fighting antioxidants are found.

Apples can aid digestion.

In the past, you may have heard that fiber is excellent for your digestive system, and it’s true! According to Harvard Health Publishing, both forms of fiber (soluble and insoluble, meaning it cannot be absorbed in water) are necessary for digestion. According to researchers at the University of Illinois, apples contain both types.

In addition to slowing digestion, soluble fiber also delays the digestion of glucose, which helps keep your blood sugar levels in check. To assist with digestion and regularity, insoluble fiber may help move food through your system.

According to the University of Illinois, insoluble fiber is found in the apple’s skin, so be sure to consume it.

It may help you lose weight.

It’s no surprise that apples may aid in weight reduction since a medium apple packs in less than 100 calories. In the end, it’s the kind of apple that you eat that matters—according to one research study, eating apple slices before a meal made people feel more full and satisfied than those who ate apple sauce and apple juice or none at all. In the same research, people who ate apple slices before their meal consumed an average of 200 fewer calories than those who did not.

The kind of apple you consume may also have a role in your health. According to animal research published in Food Chemistry, Granny Smith apples had fewer carbohydrates and more non-digestible chemicals, including feel-full fiber than McIntosh, Golden Delicious, and other popular kinds. Some obesity-related health issues may be reduced due to the chemicals’ ability to feed good gut microorganisms. Recent lab research discovered that Bifidobacteria, beneficial microbes in our microbiome, increased when we ate full skin-on apples rich in prebiotics.

What do you think?

Written by Babatunde Okerayi

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